Quality Assurance & Quality Control
Introduction to Radon Mitigation
Worker Health & Safety
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Introduction to Non-Residential Radon Measurements

Commercial, School, and Large Buildings

Unlike residential testing, protocols for testing commercial, school, or large buildings is as unique as the building being scrutinized. For example, in most situations residential testing typically requires only one test device in the lowest level of the home in contact with the ground in an area suitable for occupancy. Some states may also require test devices be placed in additional rooms [suitable for occupancy] over subsequent foundations to characterize multiple radon entry sources. However, in commercial, school, and large buildings a test device is typically placed in every frequently occupied room in contact with the ground to characterize multiple radon entry sources and fluctuations due to HVAC nuances. Some states require additional license provisions and federal mandates exist for different types of federally backed loans. Professionals undertaking measurements in commercial, school, and large buildings should obtain advanced education and seek information specific to state laws, local ordinances, or federal mandates before bidding commercial, school, or large buildings testing projects.

Multifamily Buildings [4+ attached dwellings]

When testing for radon in multifamilily buildings, protocols exist to characterize radon entry points across the foundation or footprint of the building rather than in one specific unit. These unique protocols do not pertain to a test conducted for the buyer of an individual condominium unit or the tenant of a specific rental unit. Rather, these protocols are typically applied when the owner or purchaser of the building [not a specific unit] is testing for the presence of radon to comply with requirements imposed by a state, federal, or financial institution. Some states require additional license provisions and federal mandates exist for different types of federally backed loans. Professionals undertaking measurements in multifamily buildings should obtain advanced education and seek information specific to state laws, local ordinances, or federal mandates before bidding multifamily testing projects.